Image of a African child wearing glasses as part of article on Health Reform in the United States.

Health Reform Heroes: What can we learn from Rwanda?

Other countries have proven that health, government and business leaders can work together to decide on what all citizens should have access to and create programs to provide universal access even in the most challenging of circumstances.

Such is the case in Rwanda. Five years ago, the government made a commitment to create a nationwide program to provide universal eye care to all citizens.

Why vision care? More than 2.5 billion people around the world suffer from poor vision without access to even the most basic treatment. Poor vision affects the ability of a child to see a classroom chalkboard or learn to read. It affects an adult’s ability to work.  

Making a singular commitment of providing universal access to vision care for all citizens was just right for a country like Rwanda. This choice addressed a health issue affecting all citizens, did not require an expensive, high tech solution and contributed to health improvement in ways that help break the cycle of poverty, especially for women.

To make universal access to eye care possible, a public-private partnership with Vision for a Nation was created to train nurses, build supply chains for glasses and eye medications, and visit all 15,000 of the country’s villages.

As of last year, the government took over responsibility for the management and financing of the services. To date, more than 2.4 million eye screenings have been carried out with over 1.2 million treatments provided.

And so, what does the good work in Rwanda have to do with health reform in the United States? Let us recognize that the United States and Rwanda are worlds apart geographically, economically and socially. But let us also not lose sight of the fact that in a poor country where less than 20 percent of the population have access to electricity, all citizens have access to a health service that improves health and allows them to lead better lives. This life-changing service is available to all because the leaders of Rwanda made it a priority and built a coalition of like-minded people and organizations to make it a reality.

As we look ahead to the process of defining, debating and developing new approaches to the health delivery system in America, imagine if elected leaders would start by “crossing the aisle” to select one thing to which all citizens would have access. This focus would provide the dual benefit of measurably improving outcomes while empowering citizens to lead more healthy productive lives. At the same time it would demonstrate that those we’ve sent to Washington D.C. could actually work together to accomplish something meaningful.


For Consideration:

  • If the United States could demonstrate change by providing its citizens universal access to one service or area, what would it be (and why)?
  • Do you believe all citizens should have equal access to a set of services? If yes, broadly what should be covered?
  • Consider asking your elected officials what one thing would they be most willing to champion to improve access to health services that benefit everyone.

Additional Resources:

Learn more about the work of Vision for a Nation and its mission to unlock the potential of the world’s poorest communities by making eye care globally accessible.

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